Book Launch

At last, we’ve finally published Almost Italian in full color for Kindle. It’s now available on Amazon, and the Nook & iPad editions will be out very soon. So, start a pot of water boiling for your pasta, choose a red sauce recipe from the book, and help us celebrate the launch of Almost Italian: A Cookbook & History of Italian Food in America.

Poster for the Fabre Shipline
The Fabre Steamship Line
brought Italian immigrants to ports in North and South America.

What if you could channel an Italian grandmother, your own nonna or that lady across the street who showed you how to make cavatelli? Suppose you could cook from her time-tested recipes while hearing the back-stories of your favorite dishes and their originators, the immigrants who created and shared the abbondanza of Italian-American cooking? What if you could serve these with sides of luscious contemporary color photography and vintage Polaroids from the family album? Almost Italian: A Cookbook & History of Italian Food in America offers all this—and much more.

In our new book, we’ve expanded our popular culinary blog, AlmostItalian.com, as we examine the evolution of Italian cookery outside Italy.

Beginning with Italians who arrived in America during the huge waves of immigration in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, we turn our insatiable curiosity to the culinary diversity of Italians and trace traditions from the Old World to the New.

We decode Italian-American dialects and slang, the mystique of Sunday Gravy, and the cult of cucuzza. With the world’s first photo essay on how to clean and cook scungilli, to the racy origins of Valentine’s Day, and our unvarnished opinion of Lobster Fra Diavolo, Almost Italian has the snap and freshness of the first shoots of wild asparagus foraged by Skip’s Sicilian grandparents.

Skip's grandmother Carmelina's lasagne
Skip’s grandmother Carmelina’s lasagne

Here in America, Italian immigrants found a gastronomic landscape of both limitation and opportunity. Initially, some of the basic ingredients we now associate with Italian cooking—olive oil, sheep’s milk cheeses, and even pasta—were not readily available to the newcomers. But at the same time, the Italians were amazed to discover the affordability of other foods that had been out of reach for them back in Italy They were particularly struck by the enormous quantities of meat and chicken, and, surprisingly, by pasta made from durum wheat. We challenge the widespread—but mistaken—idea that pasta was the staple food of poor Italian peasants. (In fact, most European Italians would not enjoy pasta as an everyday dish until the 1960’s.)

It was both this lack—and abundance—that inspired an entirely new cuisine here in the New World, what we have come to know as Italian-American. From antipasti to dolci, Almost Italian tells the story of how cucina casalinga, the immigrants’ home cooking, became “Italian” restaurant fare.

From the Connecticut kitchens of our grandparents and the pizzerie of our teen years to the restaurants and home kitchens where we, too, have cooked—we have watched, listened, chopped, and stirred our way to a profound appreciation of the “red sauce” cooking too often dismissed as “not real Italian.”

In addition to analyzing the Stuffies sold from clam trucks on the Rhode Island shore and recreating the ephemeral Cioppino of San Francisco’s North Beach, we have made pilgrimages to dine in red sauce shrines with maitre d’s and to sit at the lunch counters of grocery stores in Little Italy neighborhoods. Documenting our experiences between bites, we have persisted, like archeologists, working to collect recipes, tales, and delectable bits of trivia.

The final book cover
Now available for Kindle on Amazon.com

Heavily illustrated, Almost Italian includes scores of our own color photos, including shots of Eggplant Rollatini, Escarole and Beans, and Pizza Rustica, which share the electronic screen with nostalgic postcards, posters, family snapshots, and menus.

Whether your taste runs towards Spaghetti with Meatballs or to Pasta Primavera, towards Enrico Caruso or to Louis Prima, we know you’ll enjoy this richly anecdotal and wry commentary on the culture and evolution of Italian food in America.

Almost Italian is an all-American story, one that belongs to us all.

eBook available for Amazon Kindle,
iPad & Nook versions available, too.

For all media inquiries: info@almostitalian.com